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Today I Met: The Everyday Projects

To see photos from daily life from around the world, explore these Everyday Projects: @everydayafrica, @everydayusa, @everydaymiddleeast, @everydayasia, @everydaylatinamerica, @everydayiran, @everydayjamaica, @everydayeasterneurope, @everydaysrilanka, and @everydayegypt.

This weekend on the festival grounds of Photoville, a public photography exhibition in New York City, the contributing photographers of the Everyday Projects are meeting each other for the first time. “This feels like the ultimate modern moment,” says writer Austin Merrill (@austin_merrill), who along with photographer Peter Di Campo (@pdicampo) co-founded Everyday Africa (@everydayafrica) in 2012. “We’ve all been talking together for so long from across the world that to finally bring this incredible group together in person is electrifying. It’s like we are already family. There was no ‘let’s get to know each other’, we just hit the ground running.”

Austin and Peter’s project has become a global phenomenon, with international photographers creating and contributing to Everyday editions in their own regions. Austin says, “The Everyday Projects give important perspective and context to what life is like for people around the world, outside of just the bad things that happen.”

Reblogged from Instagram Blog

iheartmyart:

Chyrum Lambert

  1. I Was Planning On Calling Home #13 (Drama And Theatrical Department), 2013, 20 x 26 inches, ink wash, oil paint, acrylic paint, rit dye, hand painted, cut, and adhered onto an 80 lb cover sheet
  2. Long Lengths Of Linked Chain, Feet And Feet Of It2014, 40 x 52 inches, ink wash, acrylic paint, pencil, rit dye, wax, rust wash, hand painted, cut, and adhered onto an 80 lb cover sheet
  3. The Helmet In 2014 / Sculpture by Henry Moore*, *Sculpture represented is The Helmet, 1939-40, bronze, 2014, 40 x 26 inches, ink wash, oil paint, pencil, acrylic paint,hand painted, cut, and adhered onto an 80 lb cover sheet
  4. More Scenes From “The Garden”2014, 40 x 26 inches, ink wash, oil paint, wax, acrylic paint, pencil, rit dye, rust wash, 
    hand painted, cut, and adhered , onto an 80 lb cover sheet
  5. Running Water / Red Tile2014, 26 x 40 inches, ink wash, rit dye, wax, acrylic paint, pencil„ hand painted, cut, and adhered onto an 80 lb cover sheet
  6. Oil In The Water, 2014, 40 x 26 inches, ink wash, acrylic paint, pencil, rit dye, hand painted, cut, and adhered onto an 80 lb cover sheet
  7. I Was Planning On Calling Home #1 (Smear), 2013, 20 x 26 inches, ink wash, oil paint, acrylic paint, wax, rit dye, chalk, hand painted, cut, and adhered onto an 80 lb cover sheet, images posted with the permission of the artist.
Reblogged from iheartmyart ♥

unexplained-events:

Photos by Philipp Igumnov.

Reblogged from Lolita Loves Lowenbot

iheartmyart:

Archan Nair, ”Ganesha”, 2014

Website // Facebook // Instagram

Reblogged from iheartmyart ♥

nevver:

Erwin Blumenfeld, The New Yorker

Reblogged from this isn't happiness.

nevver:

Death Valley days, Jordan Sullivan

Reblogged from this isn't happiness.

archatlas:

Saltscapes San Francisco Bay Cris Benton

Benton’s images allow us to slip our earthly bonds and see the world from new heights, his aerial views offering a fresh perspective on familiar landscapes. Surprising and sublime, Saltscapes can be enjoyed equally as a collection of art photography and a portrait of ecological transformation and resilience.”

nataliekucken:

diary photographs from 2012 that i think look good together

Reblogged from dust motes
sircle:

"Glitched is a set started in 2013. It is currently composed of seven pieces composed as follows: in a smoked glass cube, which allows only very little light, is a diorama, a revival of a scene in volume, scaled. in Glitched#1, you can see a road, streetlights, trees, bushes, various urban elements and a house. The house is a 3D print (stereolithography) of a 3D file having been corrupted. Indeed, the original file of a classic suburban house has been forced to go through several stages of interpretation of the data, passing through various voluntarily inappropriate softwares, causing data corruption, the generation of an (or several) error(s), uncontrolled modification of the initial volume: a “glitch” (*). This is this glitch that is shown in the black cube. Filters, blocking 95% of light, set the scene in an artificial night. The shape of the object allows 5 different views of the scene, which is discernible only at a very short distance from the glass walls, stimulating the viewer’s curiosity. In each of the scenes from the set “Glitched”, there is no evidence of movement or displacement, and no representation of any alive beings, which plunges it into a confused temporal setting, wedged between photography and cinematography . This set is based on researches by Heinz Von Foerster, applied to the fields of Art. Heinz Von Foerster was an Austrian scientist and philosopher, founder of cybernetics. His studies propose to enter into a post-digital era because we’d reached the end of digital systems, which leaves no place for errors, Heinz Von Foerster concluded thus the need to create physical systems creating errors in order to discover new shapes. Here is a (small) thumbed his nose at this, because it is digital systems themselves, cleverly diverted, causing these errors, and opening up new fields of investigation."

sircle:

"Glitched is a set started in 2013. It is currently composed of seven pieces composed as follows: in a smoked glass cube, which allows only very little light, is a diorama, a revival of a scene in volume, scaled. in Glitched#1, you can see a road, streetlights, trees, bushes, various urban elements and a house. The house is a 3D print (stereolithography) of a 3D file having been corrupted. Indeed, the original file of a classic suburban house has been forced to go through several stages of interpretation of the data, passing through various voluntarily inappropriate softwares, causing data corruption, the generation of an (or several) error(s), uncontrolled modification of the initial volume: a “glitch” (*). This is this glitch that is shown in the black cube. Filters, blocking 95% of light, set the scene in an artificial night. The shape of the object allows 5 different views of the scene, which is discernible only at a very short distance from the glass walls, stimulating the viewer’s curiosity. In each of the scenes from the set “Glitched”, there is no evidence of movement or displacement, and no representation of any alive beings, which plunges it into a confused temporal setting, wedged between photography and cinematography . This set is based on researches by Heinz Von Foerster, applied to the fields of Art. Heinz Von Foerster was an Austrian scientist and philosopher, founder of cybernetics. His studies propose to enter into a post-digital era because we’d reached the end of digital systems, which leaves no place for errors, Heinz Von Foerster concluded thus the need to create physical systems creating errors in order to discover new shapes. Here is a (small) thumbed his nose at this, because it is digital systems themselves, cleverly diverted, causing these errors, and opening up new fields of investigation."

Reblogged from Sanithna

iheartmyart:

Steve KimDeath March for Polygon, 2012

Reblogged from iheartmyart ♥

likeafieldmouse:

Jacob van Loon - Selections from the ongoing series Schaeffer 

1. Lions’ Den

2. Cavity

3. Cavern

4. Invertebrate

5. Quiet Pour

6. 43.217114 | -88.264342

7. Crossfader I

8. Crossfader I (detail)

9. Shorn West

10. Shorn West (detail)

View more of the series on Behance

Purchase prints from the series here

Reblogged from not shaking the grass

iheartmyart:

Aron Wiesenfeld

  1. God of the Forest, 39 x 28 in., oil on canvas, 2014
  2. Border, 56.5 x 80 in., oil on canvas, 2014
  3. November, 30.5 x 49 in., oil on canvas, 2014
  4. October, 23 x 35 in., oil on canvas, 2014
  5. The Return, 30 x 33.5 in., oil on canvas, 2014, images posted with permission of the artist.

New exhibition, Aron Wiesenfeld: Solstice at Arcadia Contemporary in New York, September 18 - October 3rd, 2014

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 18th from 6 to 9 pm
51 Greene Street, New York

______

See more on:
♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list pinterest  

More Aron Wiesenfeld on iheartmyart.
More painting on iheartmyart.

Reblogged from iheartmyart ♥

hypnoticlandscape:

Frederic Edwin Church

samspratt:

“Logic - Under Pressure” - Album Cover illustration for Def Jam Recordings by Sam Spratt

I usually don’t like to give much context or explainer for anything I’m illustrating, but this is an exception. When Logic reached out to have me paint the cover art for his debut album under Def Jam (this is the first of 2 covers) he started by just telling me his story.
He grew up in poverty in a very broken home filled with violence, abuse, drugs, his brother dealt crack to his own father, mother was stabbed, he was kicked out of school, out of the house, all by age 17, and when these systems failed him, he turned to his friend to stay in his basement — with a couple others close to him, he sat down and started to write — to make music. He showed me a few grainy low-res photos which was all he had from this basement — enough to look at and see how the room was laid out, but little else. There just wasn’t any sort of documentation of that specific moment/feeling he had there — which despite everything that had happened prior, was a positive and warm memory. So he explained to me this quiet scene in the basement of him reading his recently written lyrics off his phone while his two friends sat there, listened, and the sun started to go down and bleed through the window. He described some of the things that filled this basement like an old thrift store painting of a car, an ugly yellow moth-eaten sofa, perpetually twisted-up window blinds, a stolen street sign, the colors, the materials of the desk, stereo, and speakers, down to some of the stickers that were pasted over it. And then he asked me to recreate that.
So this album cover was about a month worth of researching, sketching, and painting but not for a glitzy portrait like I assumed I’d be doing as rap album art — instead it was piecing together the mood, color, feeling, action, and setting of a very vivid, fairly unexceptional, yet important memory that a camera just never captured. I’ll have more to share in the near future as to how this was made in-depth, the back cover, and the other album artwork we worked on together, but I thought I’d share a bit about what went into this one. When you hear the album, it’ll make even more sense as it has this amazing narrative throughout the whole thing that we worked hard together to sync up on the art side. If you’ve never listened to Logic, here’s a small taste of what to expect on a couple awesome tracks: HERE and HERE with Childish Gambino.
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